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Acute Viral Gastroenteritis in Children : Clinical Features & Diagnosis

Acute viral gastroenteritis is a common condition in children, typically caused by viruses such as rotavirus, norovirus, or adenovirus, leading to inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. Clinical features include sudden onset of vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, fever, and sometimes dehydration, which can be severe, especially in younger children. Children with viral gastroenteritis may exhibit symptoms of lethargy, decreased urine output, dry mucous membranes, and poor feeding due to nausea and abdominal discomfort. Diagnosis is primarily based on clinical presentation, with stool studies occasionally performed to identify the specific virus responsible. Physical examination may reveal signs of dehydration, such as sunken eyes, decreased skin turgor, and rapid heart rate, requiring prompt fluid rehydration. Treatment focuses on supportive care, including oral or intravenous rehydration to prevent and manage dehydration, and adequate nutrition to support recovery. Antiemetics may be considered for persistent vomiting, while antibiotics are generally not indicated unless bacterial coinfection is suspected.

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Dr. Pandu Chouhan Profile Image

Dr. Pandu Chouhan

Consultant Pediatric Gastroenterology, KIMS Hospital Hyderabad

Dr. Pandu Chouhan is currently working as Consultant Pediatric Gastroenterology, KIMS Hospitals, Hyderabad. With qualifications including an MBBS from Osmania Medical College, Hyderabad, and an MD in Pediatrics from AIIMS, New Delhi

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Dr. Pandu Chouhan's Talks on Assimilate

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Dr. Pandu Chouhan
  • 18th-April-2024, TIME : 3:00PM - 4:00PM
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Acute viral gastroenteritis is a common condition in children, typically caused by viruses such as rotavirus, norovirus, or adenovirus, leading to inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. Clinical features include sudden onset of vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, fever, and sometimes dehydration, which can be severe, especially in younger children. Children with viral gastroenteritis may exhibit symptoms of lethargy, decreased urine output, dry mucous membranes, and poor feeding due to nausea and abdominal discomfort. Diagnosis is primarily based on clinical presentation, with stool studies occasionally performed to identify the specific virus responsible. Physical examination may reveal signs of dehydration, such as sunken eyes, decreased skin turgor, and rapid heart rate, requiring prompt fluid rehydration. Treatment focuses on supportive care, including oral or intravenous rehydration to prevent and manage dehydration, and adequate nutrition to support recovery. Antiemetics may be considered for persistent vomiting, while antibiotics are generally not indicated unless bacterial coinfection is suspected.

webinar
Dr. Pandu Chouhan
  • 18th-April-2024, TIME : 3:00PM - 4:00PM
  • 0

Acute viral gastroenteritis is a common condition in children, typically caused by viruses such as rotavirus, norovirus, or adenovirus, leading to inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. Clinical features include sudden onset of vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, fever, and sometimes dehydration, which can be severe, especially in younger children. Children with viral gastroenteritis may exhibit symptoms of lethargy, decreased urine output, dry mucous membranes, and poor feeding due to nausea and abdominal discomfort. Diagnosis is primarily based on clinical presentation, with stool studies occasionally performed to identify the specific virus responsible. Physical examination may reveal signs of dehydration, such as sunken eyes, decreased skin turgor, and rapid heart rate, requiring prompt fluid rehydration. Treatment focuses on supportive care, including oral or intravenous rehydration to prevent and manage dehydration, and adequate nutrition to support recovery. Antiemetics may be considered for persistent vomiting, while antibiotics are generally not indicated unless bacterial coinfection is suspected.