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Total Anomalous Pulmonary Venous Connection- Overview​

Total anomalous pulmonary venous connection (TAPVC) is a condition in which, with or without pulmonary venous blockage, all four pulmonary veins drain into systemic veins or the right atrium. In the right atrium, systemic and pulmonary venous blood are mixed. In both foetal and newborn circulation, the presence of an atrial defect or foramen ovale (a component of the complex) is significant for left ventricular output. TAPVR and PAPVR may be detected during pregnancy, however this is less common than discovering them immediately after a baby is delivered. TAPVR babies will require surgery to correct the flaw. The severity of the child's illness and the precise design of the atypical connections between the pulmonary veins and the right atrium determine the age at which the surgery is performed. Normal blood flow through the heart will be restored as a result of the surgical TAPVR correction. In order to correct this problem, clinicians typically join the pulmonary veins to the left atrium, block any unnatural blood vessel connections, and seal the atrial septal defect. Infants with surgically corrected abnormalities may experience lifelong consequences; they are not necessarily cured. A cardiologist (a physician who specialises in the heart) will need to see a kid or adult with TAPVR on a regular basis to check on their progress, prevent problems, and assess their heart.

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Dr. Prabhata Rashmi

Sr. consultant & HOD of Pediatric Cardiac Surgery

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Total anomalous pulmonary venous connection (TAPVC) is a condition in which, with or without pulmonary venous blockage, all four pulmonary veins drain into systemic veins or the right atrium. In the right atrium, systemic and pulmonary venous blood are mixed. In both foetal and newborn circulation, the presence of an atrial defect or foramen ovale (a component of the complex) is significant for left ventricular output. TAPVR and PAPVR may be detected during pregnancy, however this is less common than discovering them immediately after a baby is delivered. TAPVR babies will require surgery to correct the flaw. The severity of the child's illness and the precise design of the atypical connections between the pulmonary veins and the right atrium determine the age at which the surgery is performed. Normal blood flow through the heart will be restored as a result of the surgical TAPVR correction. In order to correct this problem, clinicians typically join the pulmonary veins to the left atrium, block any unnatural blood vessel connections, and seal the atrial septal defect. Infants with surgically corrected abnormalities may experience lifelong consequences; they are not necessarily cured. A cardiologist (a physician who specialises in the heart) will need to see a kid or adult with TAPVR on a regular basis to check on their progress, prevent problems, and assess their heart.