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Hypoglycemia in Adults

Hypoglycemia in adults refers to an abnormally low level of blood glucose, typically below 70 mg/dL, and can cause a range of symptoms from mild discomfort to severe medical emergencies. It often results from an imbalance between insulin or oral hypoglycemic agent administration and carbohydrate intake, commonly affecting individuals with diabetes. Symptoms of hypoglycemia can include shakiness, sweating, confusion, irritability, dizziness, and palpitations. If not promptly addressed, it can lead to severe neurological symptoms such as seizures, loss of consciousness, and even coma. Factors contributing to hypoglycemia include excessive doses of insulin or diabetes medications, skipping meals, intense physical activity, and alcohol consumption. Immediate treatment involves the consumption of fast-acting carbohydrates, such as glucose tablets, fruit juice, or regular soda. For recurrent episodes, it is crucial to identify and manage underlying causes, which may involve adjusting medication dosages, meal planning, and continuous glucose monitoring. In severe cases, where an individual is unable to self-treat, emergency glucagon administration and medical intervention may be necessary. Preventive strategies include regular monitoring of blood glucose levels, educating patients on recognizing early symptoms, and ensuring proper coordination between diet, medication, and physical activity.

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Dr. Adarsh K.S. 
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Dr. Adarsh K.S.

Consultant in Dept of Endocrinology, Manipal Hospitals,Bangalore

Dr. Adarsh K S is a distinguished Consultant in the Department of Endocrinology at Manipal Hospitals in Bangalore, with an extensive educational background comprising an MBBS, MD in Medicine, and a DM in Endocrinology from some of India's prestigious institutes. He brings a wealth of knowledge and experience to his role, particularly in the realm of endocrinological disorders. His academic journey has seen him contribute to notable projects and publications, including research on osteoporosis risk assessment tools and studies on caloric and macronutrient intake in women with polycystic ovarian syndrome. His work has been recognized in various professional forums, evidenced by his oral presentation at APICON 2014 and a poster presentation at ESICON 2018. Dr. Adarsh is committed to ongoing professional development, as shown by his participation in significant CMEs and workshops, including the Diabetes and Endocrinology Update and the Tumour Summit at SGPGIMS, Lucknow. Fluent in English, Hindi, and Kannada, he combines his clinical expertise with academic prowess to advance the field of endocrinology.

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Hypoglycemia in adults refers to an abnormally low level of blood glucose, typically below 70 mg/dL, and can cause a range of symptoms from mild discomfort to severe medical emergencies. It often results from an imbalance between insulin or oral hypoglycemic agent administration and carbohydrate intake, commonly affecting individuals with diabetes. Symptoms of hypoglycemia can include shakiness, sweating, confusion, irritability, dizziness, and palpitations. If not promptly addressed, it can lead to severe neurological symptoms such as seizures, loss of consciousness, and even coma. Factors contributing to hypoglycemia include excessive doses of insulin or diabetes medications, skipping meals, intense physical activity, and alcohol consumption. Immediate treatment involves the consumption of fast-acting carbohydrates, such as glucose tablets, fruit juice, or regular soda. For recurrent episodes, it is crucial to identify and manage underlying causes, which may involve adjusting medication dosages, meal planning, and continuous glucose monitoring. In severe cases, where an individual is unable to self-treat, emergency glucagon administration and medical intervention may be necessary. Preventive strategies include regular monitoring of blood glucose levels, educating patients on recognizing early symptoms, and ensuring proper coordination between diet, medication, and physical activity.