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Approach to Fever – History & Examination

Fever in adults is defined as a temperature higher than 38.3 C (100.9 F) that lasts for more than three weeks with no obvious source despite appropriate investigation. The four categories of potential etiology of Fever are classic, nosocomial, immune deficient, and human immunodeficiency virus–related. The four subgroups of the differential diagnosis of Fever are infections, malignancies, autoimmune conditions, and miscellaneous. A thorough history, physical examination, and standard laboratory testing remain the basis of the initial evaluation of the patient with Fever.

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Dr. Raman Kumar

President of Academy of Family Physicians of India (AFPI), President of World Association of Family Physicians of the South Asia Region

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Dr. Raman Kumar
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Fever in adults is defined as a temperature higher than 38.3 C (100.9 F) that lasts for more than three weeks with no obvious source despite appropriate investigation. The four categories of potential etiology of Fever are classic, nosocomial, immune deficient, and human immunodeficiency virus–related. The four subgroups of the differential diagnosis of Fever are infections, malignancies, autoimmune conditions, and miscellaneous. A thorough history, physical examination, and standard laboratory testing remain the basis of the initial evaluation of the patient with Fever.

webinar
Dr. Raman Kumar
  • 0

Fever in adults is defined as a temperature higher than 38.3 C (100.9 F) that lasts for more than three weeks with no obvious source despite appropriate investigation. The four categories of potential etiology of Fever are classic, nosocomial, immune deficient, and human immunodeficiency virus–related. The four subgroups of the differential diagnosis of Fever are infections, malignancies, autoimmune conditions, and miscellaneous. A thorough history, physical examination, and standard laboratory testing remain the basis of the initial evaluation of the patient with Fever.

webinar
Dr. Raman Kumar
  • 0

Fever in adults is defined as a temperature higher than 38.3 C (100.9 F) that lasts for more than three weeks with no obvious source despite appropriate investigation. The four categories of potential etiology of Fever are classic, nosocomial, immune deficient, and human immunodeficiency virus–related. The four subgroups of the differential diagnosis of Fever are infections, malignancies, autoimmune conditions, and miscellaneous. A thorough history, physical examination, and standard laboratory testing remain the basis of the initial evaluation of the patient with Fever.

webinar
Dr. Raman Kumar
  • 0

Fever in adults is defined as a temperature higher than 38.3 C (100.9 F) that lasts for more than three weeks with no obvious source despite appropriate investigation. The four categories of potential etiology of Fever are classic, nosocomial, immune deficient, and human immunodeficiency virus–related. The four subgroups of the differential diagnosis of Fever are infections, malignancies, autoimmune conditions, and miscellaneous. A thorough history, physical examination, and standard laboratory testing remain the basis of the initial evaluation of the patient with Fever.

webinar
Dr. Raman Kumar
  • 0

Fever in adults is defined as a temperature higher than 38.3 C (100.9 F) that lasts for more than three weeks with no obvious source despite appropriate investigation. The four categories of potential etiology of Fever are classic, nosocomial, immune deficient, and human immunodeficiency virus–related. The four subgroups of the differential diagnosis of Fever are infections, malignancies, autoimmune conditions, and miscellaneous. A thorough history, physical examination, and standard laboratory testing remain the basis of the initial evaluation of the patient with Fever.

webinar
Dr. Raman Kumar
  • 0

Fever in adults is defined as a temperature higher than 38.3 C (100.9 F) that lasts for more than three weeks with no obvious source despite appropriate investigation. The four categories of potential etiology of Fever are classic, nosocomial, immune deficient, and human immunodeficiency virus–related. The four subgroups of the differential diagnosis of Fever are infections, malignancies, autoimmune conditions, and miscellaneous. A thorough history, physical examination, and standard laboratory testing remain the basis of the initial evaluation of the patient with Fever.

webinar
Dr. Raman Kumar
  • 0

Fever in adults is defined as a temperature higher than 38.3 C (100.9 F) that lasts for more than three weeks with no obvious source despite appropriate investigation. The four categories of potential etiology of Fever are classic, nosocomial, immune deficient, and human immunodeficiency virus–related. The four subgroups of the differential diagnosis of Fever are infections, malignancies, autoimmune conditions, and miscellaneous. A thorough history, physical examination, and standard laboratory testing remain the basis of the initial evaluation of the patient with Fever.

webinar
Dr. Raman Kumar
  • 0

Fever in adults is defined as a temperature higher than 38.3 C (100.9 F) that lasts for more than three weeks with no obvious source despite appropriate investigation. The four categories of potential etiology of Fever are classic, nosocomial, immune deficient, and human immunodeficiency virus–related. The four subgroups of the differential diagnosis of Fever are infections, malignancies, autoimmune conditions, and miscellaneous. A thorough history, physical examination, and standard laboratory testing remain the basis of the initial evaluation of the patient with Fever.

webinar
Dr. Raman Kumar
  • 0

Fever in adults is defined as a temperature higher than 38.3 C (100.9 F) that lasts for more than three weeks with no obvious source despite appropriate investigation. The four categories of potential etiology of Fever are classic, nosocomial, immune deficient, and human immunodeficiency virus–related. The four subgroups of the differential diagnosis of Fever are infections, malignancies, autoimmune conditions, and miscellaneous. A thorough history, physical examination, and standard laboratory testing remain the basis of the initial evaluation of the patient with Fever.

webinar
Dr. Raman Kumar
  • 0

Fever in adults is defined as a temperature higher than 38.3 C (100.9 F) that lasts for more than three weeks with no obvious source despite appropriate investigation. The four categories of potential etiology of Fever are classic, nosocomial, immune deficient, and human immunodeficiency virus–related. The four subgroups of the differential diagnosis of Fever are infections, malignancies, autoimmune conditions, and miscellaneous. A thorough history, physical examination, and standard laboratory testing remain the basis of the initial evaluation of the patient with Fever.

webinar
Dr. Raman Kumar
  • 0

Fever in adults is defined as a temperature higher than 38.3 C (100.9 F) that lasts for more than three weeks with no obvious source despite appropriate investigation. The four categories of potential etiology of Fever are classic, nosocomial, immune deficient, and human immunodeficiency virus–related. The four subgroups of the differential diagnosis of Fever are infections, malignancies, autoimmune conditions, and miscellaneous. A thorough history, physical examination, and standard laboratory testing remain the basis of the initial evaluation of the patient with Fever.