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Shoulder Impingement Syndrome

Shoulder impingement syndrome is a common cause of shoulder pain characterized by the compression or impingement of the rotator cuff tendons and subacromial bursa between the acromion (a bony prominence on the shoulder blade) and the head of the humerus (upper arm bone). This condition often results from repetitive overhead arm movements, such as those seen in sports or certain occupational activities, leading to inflammation and irritation of the structures within the subacromial space. Individuals with shoulder impingement syndrome typically experience pain, especially when lifting the arm overhead or during specific shoulder movements. Conservative treatments, including rest, physical therapy to strengthen the rotator cuff muscles, anti-inflammatory medications, and modification of activities, are often effective in managing symptoms. In some cases, if conservative measures are not successful, corticosteroid injections or, rarely, surgical intervention may be considered to alleviate impingement and restore shoulder function. Early diagnosis and appropriate management are essential for optimal outcomes in individuals with shoulder impingement syndrome.

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Dr. Youssef Fallaha

HOD & Consultant Orthopedic Surgery, Mediclinic Welcare, DXB

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Shoulder impingement syndrome is a common cause of shoulder pain characterized by the compression or impingement of the rotator cuff tendons and subacromial bursa between the acromion (a bony prominence on the shoulder blade) and the head of the humerus (upper arm bone). This condition often results from repetitive overhead arm movements, such as those seen in sports or certain occupational activities, leading to inflammation and irritation of the structures within the subacromial space. Individuals with shoulder impingement syndrome typically experience pain, especially when lifting the arm overhead or during specific shoulder movements. Conservative treatments, including rest, physical therapy to strengthen the rotator cuff muscles, anti-inflammatory medications, and modification of activities, are often effective in managing symptoms. In some cases, if conservative measures are not successful, corticosteroid injections or, rarely, surgical intervention may be considered to alleviate impingement and restore shoulder function. Early diagnosis and appropriate management are essential for optimal outcomes in individuals with shoulder impingement syndrome.