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Neuroplasticity and its Role on Recovery After Stroke

Neuroplasticity, the brain's remarkable ability to reorganize itself by forming new neural connections, plays a critical role in recovery after stroke. When a stroke occurs, blood flow to parts of the brain is interrupted, causing cell death and impairing function in affected areas. Neuroplasticity facilitates recovery by allowing other parts of the brain to take over the functions lost due to the stroke. This process is driven by the brain's inherent capacity to adapt through mechanisms such as synaptic plasticity, where synapses strengthen or weaken over time, and structural plasticity, involving the growth of new neurons and the reorganization of neural networks. Rehabilitation therapies, such as physical, occupational, and speech therapy, leverage neuroplasticity by providing repetitive, task-specific practice that encourages the brain to rewire itself. Advanced techniques like constraint-induced movement therapy, mirror therapy, and non-invasive brain stimulation further enhance neuroplasticity by promoting activity in the affected regions. The timing and intensity of these interventions are crucial, as the brain is most malleable in the early stages following a stroke. However, neuroplasticity can continue to support recovery even months or years after the initial event. Factors influencing the extent of neuroplastic changes include the severity of the stroke, the individual's age, overall health, and engagement in rehabilitation. Ultimately, neuroplasticity is a foundational concept in stroke recovery, providing a pathway for regaining lost functions and improving quality of life through targeted, adaptive interventions.

About the Speaker

Dr. Dharam P. Pandey Profile Image

Dr. Dharam P. Pandey

Director & HOD, Department of Physiotherapy & Rehabilitation Sciences, Manipal Hospitals, Delhi

Dr. Dharam P. Pandey, the Director and Head of the Department of Physiotherapy & Rehabilitation Sciences at Manipal Hospitals, Dwarka, Delhi, is a distinguished clinician, researcher, and academic leader with over two decades of experience. His exceptional qualifications include a Ph.D. in Neurological Physiotherapy and advanced certifications from esteemed institutions worldwide in Osteopathy, Neuro-Developmental Treatment, Spinal Structural Balance, and more. Dr. Pandey's pioneering research in AI-powered and frequency-tuned electromagnetic field therapies has significantly advanced non-invasive rehabilitation techniques, earning him recognition in top-tier journals like Frontiers in Neurology and Brain Stimulation. As a dedicated educator, he contributes to academia through roles as a visiting professor, external examiner, and editorial board member. His contributions to neurorehabilitation, particularly in stroke and spinal cord injury recovery, have garnered numerous accolades, including the Best Researcher Award and the Physio Ratan Award. Dr. Pandey's influence extends globally, making him a sought-after speaker at international conferences and a prominent figure in the physiotherapy and rehabilitation sciences community.

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Dr. Dharam P. Pandey's Talks on Assimilate

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Dr. Dharam P. Pandey
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Neuroplasticity, the brain's remarkable ability to reorganize itself by forming new neural connections, plays a critical role in recovery after stroke. When a stroke occurs, blood flow to parts of the brain is interrupted, causing cell death and impairing function in affected areas. Neuroplasticity facilitates recovery by allowing other parts of the brain to take over the functions lost due to the stroke. This process is driven by the brain's inherent capacity to adapt through mechanisms such as synaptic plasticity, where synapses strengthen or weaken over time, and structural plasticity, involving the growth of new neurons and the reorganization of neural networks. Rehabilitation therapies, such as physical, occupational, and speech therapy, leverage neuroplasticity by providing repetitive, task-specific practice that encourages the brain to rewire itself. Advanced techniques like constraint-induced movement therapy, mirror therapy, and non-invasive brain stimulation further enhance neuroplasticity by promoting activity in the affected regions. The timing and intensity of these interventions are crucial, as the brain is most malleable in the early stages following a stroke. However, neuroplasticity can continue to support recovery even months or years after the initial event. Factors influencing the extent of neuroplastic changes include the severity of the stroke, the individual's age, overall health, and engagement in rehabilitation. Ultimately, neuroplasticity is a foundational concept in stroke recovery, providing a pathway for regaining lost functions and improving quality of life through targeted, adaptive interventions.