• 61.5k views

Medical management of GI Neuroendocrine tumor

The medical management of gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors (GI NETs) involves a comprehensive approach tailored to the specific characteristics of the tumor and the individual patient. For well-differentiated, low-grade tumors that exhibit hormone hypersecretion, somatostatin analogs such as octreotide and lanreotide are commonly used. These agents help control symptoms related to excess hormone production and may also exert antiproliferative effects. Targeted therapies play a significant role in the management of advanced GI NETs. Everolimus, an mTOR inhibitor, and sunitinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, are often employed to inhibit pathways involved in tumor growth and angiogenesis. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT), using radiolabeled somatostatin analogs such as lutetium-177 DOTATATE, has shown efficacy in slowing tumor progression and providing symptom relief.

About the Speaker

Dr. Mohanad Diab Profile Image

Dr. Mohanad Diab

Consultant Medical Oncologist, Burjeel Hospital, AUH

Upcoming CME Events

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

Author Post

authorimage

Impact

+

Talks

+

webinar

+

no.of registrations

One liner about speaker

Why is speaker relevant?

Dr. Mohanad Diab's Talks on Assimilate

webinar
Dr. Mohanad Diab
  • 0

The medical management of gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors (GI NETs) involves a comprehensive approach tailored to the specific characteristics of the tumor and the individual patient. For well-differentiated, low-grade tumors that exhibit hormone hypersecretion, somatostatin analogs such as octreotide and lanreotide are commonly used. These agents help control symptoms related to excess hormone production and may also exert antiproliferative effects. Targeted therapies play a significant role in the management of advanced GI NETs. Everolimus, an mTOR inhibitor, and sunitinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, are often employed to inhibit pathways involved in tumor growth and angiogenesis. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT), using radiolabeled somatostatin analogs such as lutetium-177 DOTATATE, has shown efficacy in slowing tumor progression and providing symptom relief.