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Case Discussion on Hyperglycemic Emergencies

Patients with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus may experience acute metabolic consequences such as diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperglycemic hyperosmolar state (HHS). Effective management, thorough clinical and biochemical examination, and prompt diagnosis are essential for the successful treatment of DKA and HHS. Coordinating fluid resuscitation, insulin therapy, electrolyte replacement, and constant patient monitoring while using the available laboratory tests to forecast the resolution of the hyperglycemic crisis are essential parts of managing hyperglycemic crises. To lower the risks of complications, it's critical to comprehend and promptly recognise potential unusual scenarios including DKA or HHS presentation in the comatose state, the potential for mixed acid-base disorders to obscure the diagnosis of DKA, and the risk of cerebral edema during therapy.

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Dr. Aklesh Tandekar​ Profile Image

Dr. Aklesh Tandekar​

CRITICAL CARE SPECIALIST MD, EDIC, IDCCM, FIMSA, DA, FCPS, FISCCM

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Dr. Aklesh Tandekar​'s Talks on Assimilate

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Dr. Aklesh Tandekar​
  • 3rd-January-2023, TIME : 5:00PM - 6:00PM
  • 0

Patients with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus may experience acute metabolic consequences such as diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperglycemic hyperosmolar state (HHS). Effective management, thorough clinical and biochemical examination, and prompt diagnosis are essential for the successful treatment of DKA and HHS. Coordinating fluid resuscitation, insulin therapy, electrolyte replacement, and constant patient monitoring while using the available laboratory tests to forecast the resolution of the hyperglycemic crisis are essential parts of managing hyperglycemic crises. To lower the risks of complications, it's critical to comprehend and promptly recognise potential unusual scenarios including DKA or HHS presentation in the comatose state, the potential for mixed acid-base disorders to obscure the diagnosis of DKA, and the risk of cerebral edema during therapy.

webinar
Dr. Aklesh Tandekar​
  • 3rd-January-2023, TIME : 5:00PM - 6:00PM
  • 0

Patients with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus may experience acute metabolic consequences such as diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperglycemic hyperosmolar state (HHS). Effective management, thorough clinical and biochemical examination, and prompt diagnosis are essential for the successful treatment of DKA and HHS. Coordinating fluid resuscitation, insulin therapy, electrolyte replacement, and constant patient monitoring while using the available laboratory tests to forecast the resolution of the hyperglycemic crisis are essential parts of managing hyperglycemic crises. To lower the risks of complications, it's critical to comprehend and promptly recognise potential unusual scenarios including DKA or HHS presentation in the comatose state, the potential for mixed acid-base disorders to obscure the diagnosis of DKA, and the risk of cerebral edema during therapy.

webinar
Dr. Aklesh Tandekar​
  • 3rd-January-2023, TIME : 5:00PM - 6:00PM
  • 0

Patients with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus may experience acute metabolic consequences such as diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperglycemic hyperosmolar state (HHS). Effective management, thorough clinical and biochemical examination, and prompt diagnosis are essential for the successful treatment of DKA and HHS. Coordinating fluid resuscitation, insulin therapy, electrolyte replacement, and constant patient monitoring while using the available laboratory tests to forecast the resolution of the hyperglycemic crisis are essential parts of managing hyperglycemic crises. To lower the risks of complications, it's critical to comprehend and promptly recognise potential unusual scenarios including DKA or HHS presentation in the comatose state, the potential for mixed acid-base disorders to obscure the diagnosis of DKA, and the risk of cerebral edema during therapy.